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Pollution Prevention - See Park Slide Shows Below

Practicing Pollution Prevention Each Day

Over the next few months, the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District is going to be featuring some of the beautiful parks that are located within the District’s boundaries. The bottom line is that parks, water and pollution prevention go hand-in-hand. So, the more you know about how those three work together, the more likely you’ll be to help prevent pollution from getting into our local rivers and aquifers.

 

So that’s why we’re calling this series “Learn and Live.” Each month, we will inform you about one of the must-see parks in Northern Bexar County. And with that learning, we hope you will not only want to visit that park, but you’ll also want live your life by developing the best pollution prevention habits that researchers have developed so far.

 

This month, we’ll be learning about the Crownridge Canyon Park.

 

Learning About Pollution Prevention

 

Historically, cities have paved roadways, sidewalks, trails, parking lots, sports courts, alleys, driveways, and other surfaces to reduce the annoyance and cost of slippery mud and blowing dust. Unfortunately, having so many hard, water-repelling surfaces (along with a vast number of urban rooftops) can be environmentally harmful. After it rains, vast amounts of water, now called “stormwater,” will collect in these areas, pick up the grease, grime and other pollutants that are deposited on them each day, and then head for a water source like a creek, river or aquifer. Here are some of the ways dirty stormwater can pollute a water supply:

 

  • most stormwater runoff escapes natural cleansing by plants, rocks and soil;

  • without nature slowing down the stream of water after a rain, higher amounts of water are funneled to local streams;

  • urban streams become prone to flash flooding from rapid runoff, resulting in severe scouring, erosion, and reduction of plant life;

  • once stream beds are scoured, flooding becomes more common.

 

The solution is to hold back the water where it hits, slow it down so that the destructiveness of erosion and contaminants is controlled, and that it is naturally cleaned it before it reaches a waterway or aquifer recharge feature.

 

So, now that you’ve learned how unabated stormwater can create flooding and pollution issues for our aquifers and streams, you can also understand why maintaining and increasing large natural areas like parks is so important to our community.

 

The important point to never forget is that the less runoff, and the slower the runoff we have, the less damage there is to rivers and aquifers and the overall environment.

 

Living Pollution Prevention

 

Here are the Top 6 Pollution Prevention Habits You Should Develop

  1. Practice water conservation in your home each day. The less water you use, the more water is left in the Trinity Aquifer for future use.

  2. Practice energy conservation in your home each day. Large amounts of water are needed to cool power plants that provide electricity to our city. Less energy production requires less water to be used.

  3. Use non-toxic cleaning chemicals in your home. Never dump oil or others types of solvents on the ground or in the street where they can run off into a stream or an aquifer.

  4. Use only environmentally-safe weed-killers and fertilizers on your landscapes.

  5. Always pick up your pet's waste and dispose of properly. Pet waste that runs off into a creek or stream only increases the bacteria levels in that body of water.

  6. Enjoy the parks and advocate for more green spaces in your communities.

“Learn and Live” at Friedrich Wilderness Park

Numerous natural areas and community parks beautify Northern Bexar County where the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District (TGR) works to preserve and protect the Trinity Aquifer each day. In addition to these parks’ aesthetic value, they also play a major part in preventing pollution from entering the Trinity Aquifer and Edwards Aquifer which are both critical to the water supply in Bexar County. To highlight pollution prevention message, TGR is bringing its constituents an informative series about the six major parks and natural areas in the district. This month, we are highlighting Friedrich Park located north of Loop 1604 on Milsa Drive.

Friedrich Wilderness Park offers approximately 10 miles of hiking trails with varying degrees of difficulty. It is home for rare birds, terrestrial orchids, steep hills and deep canyons. It is internationally known for bird watching. Perched on the edge of the Balcones Escarpment, Friedrich is a nesting site for the endangered Black-capped Vireo and the Golden-cheeked Warbler. 

In 1971, Norma Friedrich Ward bequeathed 180 acres of land on Heuermann Road near Leon Springs to the City of San Antonio for use as a public park. She also gave $100,000 to make improvements to the land. It was Mrs. Ward’s wish that the natural vegetation and native trees and shrubs be protected and that native birds and wildlife be protected and encouraged to use the park as a sanctuary.

The following year, Wilbur Matthews and Glen Martin donated another 52 acres to enlarge the park according to the same guidelines specified by Mrs. Ward.

The park was developed with a grant from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and was dedicated on August 31, 1978.

Preserving the community’s natural areas goes a long way toward helping efforts to maintain excellent water quality in local aquifers and other waterways. That is why the Trinity Glen Rose District is urging you to learn about the parks and to live a little by visiting each one to experience the environmental beauty and ecological benefits they provide.

For reservations and more information about the Friedrich Wilderness Park, you can visit the park’s website here.

Come “Learn and Live” at Eisenhower Park

Numerous natural areas and community parks beautify Northern Bexar County where the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District (TGR) works to preserve and protect the Trinity Aquifer each day. In addition to these parks’ aesthetic value, they also play a major part in preventing pollution from entering the Trinity Aquifer and Edwards Aquifer which are both critical to the water supply in Bexar County.

 

To highlight pollution prevention message, TGR is bringing its constituents an informative series about the six major parks and natural areas in the district. This month, we are highlighting Eisenhower Park located north of Loop 1604 on NW Military Highway.

 

Dwight D. Eisenhower Park is a 320-acre park managed by the City of San Antonio containing excellent examples of Hill Country landscapes, including wooded dry creek beds and rocky canyons. The park features more than 6 miles of paved and unpaved trails.

There are seven different trails in the park most of which are paved. The 2.5 mile Hillview Trail circles the perimeter of the park and leads to the observation tower located about midway through the hike. The one-mile Cedar Flats Trail runs through the heart of the park and contains a combination of paved and rugged terrain. All of the trails have plenty of signage posted and many of the plants and flowers you will see are marked as well.

Eisenhower Park is pet friendly, but is a designated natural area park which means roller blades, skateboards and bikes are not allowed on the trails. There are several pavilions in the park for barbecues and picnics that are located near the entrance of the park.

Various park amenities are available for rental and you can learn how to make a reservation at this link.  The City of San Antonio also offers various types of classes in the parks and you can learn about them at this link.

Preserving the community’s natural areas goes a long way toward helping efforts to maintain excellent water quality in local aquifers and other waterways. That is why the Trinity Glen Rose District is urging you to learn about the parks and to live a little by visiting each one to experience the environmental beauty and ecological benefits they provide.

You can learn more about Eisenhower Park here.

Government Canyon State Natural Area

Government Canyon State Natural Area is part of the Texas State Parks system. It is designated a natural area rather than a state park because its primary focus is protection of the property's natural resources. Given that designation, access and recreational activities may be restricted if the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) deems such action necessary to protect the environment there.

 

The reserve is located in northwestern Bexar County inside the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District’s boundaries. It protects a large, relatively pristine tract of Hill Country terrain that is home to numerous and diverse species of plants & wildlife and the upper Culebra Creek and Leon Creek watersheds. The approximately 12,000 acres of land Government Canyon State Natural Area occupies was originally purchased to protect the critical aquifer recharge zone which diverts rainfall into the Edwards Aquifer, the main source of drinking water for San Antonio.

First opened to the public in October, 2005, Government Canyon State Natural Area offers more than 41 miles of trails. Visitors can camp, attend a program or guided hike, geocache, picnic, take nature photos and look for birds and other wildlife. For those looking for a place to go birding, Government Canyon is a good place to find the endangered Golden-cheeked warbler.

One of the most visited features on the property are the dinosaur tracks which are located about 2.5 miles from the visitor’s center. Scientists believe the tracks were made about 110 million years ago. At that time, this location was actually near the shoreline of the Gulf of Mexico. The dinosaurs would walk along the moist, fine-grained mud and leave tracks which would then be exposed to the sun allowing them to dry and harden. Erosion over time have exposed the tracks for today’s people to discover, study and protect. The Witte Museum, University of Texas at San Antonio, Trinity University and Texas Parks and Wildlife are continuing to study and preserve these unique dinosaur tracks today.

You can learn more about Government Canyon here.

Crownridge Canyon Park

Crownridge Canyon was the first City natural area developed as part of the Edwards Aquifer Protection ballot initiative. The 200-acre preserve features Level 1 ADA trails and Level 4 hiking trails through a variety of habitats. Features include a canopy level bridge overlook, beautiful forested canyon bottoms, hillside vistas, and restored grasslands. There are excellent opportunities to view the endangered Golden Cheeked Warbler during its nesting season. This park features interpretive elements highlighting local flora, fauna, geology and the aquifer recharge cycle, as well as the area’s early human inhabitants. The landscape at Crownridge feature native plants of northern Bexar county.  Many are numbered and can be identified using the Natural Areas Plant Key.

 

Crownridge Canyon Trails offer both gentle Level 1 trail surfaces and more natural and challenging Level 4 surfaces. Trail markers will soon be placed along the trails to identify native plants.

 

Red Oak Trail: 

Red Oak is the lower trail loop leading to the bridge crossing Red Oak Canyon. It has a 1.3 mile stabilized base surface meeting ADA accessibility requirements. Level 1 .

 

Bear Grass Trail: 

Bear Grass Trail is a natural surface, .6 mile loop in the upper part of the park. This trail is Level 4 and offers medium difficulty with few steep slopes and rocky ledges. Level 4.

 

Pets, alcohol, bikes, and loud music are not allowed.

 

Location:

7222 Luskey Blvd. 78256

 

Hours:

Sunday-Saturday: 7:30 a.m. – sunset

“Learn and Live” at Panther Springs Park

Panther Springs Loop is a 3.6-mile lightly trafficked loop trail located near San Antonio, Texas that features beautiful wild flowers in the spring, hill country type wooded areas and many beautiful open meadow-like vistas.

The trails are paved and considered good for all skill levels of hikers, walkers and runners.

The park, which opened in March of 2015, consists of 279 acres which were donated by Dan Parman and the San Antonio River Authority (SARA). The dog park which is located near the entrance of the park includes areas for larger dogs and one for smaller ones. Bird watchers have documented 46 different species in the park to include the Greater Roadrunner, two species of hawks and numerous other types of smaller, colorful birds.

The San Antonio River Authority collaborated with the City of San Antonio in the development of Panther Springs. SARA’s portion of the project included design and construction work to improve the water and sediment conveyance in the existing natural channel. The agency continues to monitor the stream for changing conditions as the landscape slowly changes over time.

Preserving the community’s natural areas goes a long way toward helping efforts to maintain excellent water quality in local aquifers and other waterways. That is why the Trinity Glen Rose District is urging you to learn about the parks and to live a little by visiting each one to experience the environmental beauty and ecological benefits they provide.

Physical: 14789 Old Bandera, Ste. 105
Helotes, Texas 78023

Mailing: 12790 FM 1560 N. Box 1589
Helotes, Texas 78023

Phone (210) 698-1155 

Fax (210) 698-1159

mail@TrinityGlenRose.com

Disclaimer: The information on this website is compiled and made available as a public service by the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District (TGR). However, TGR makes no warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of the information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for results obtained from the use of the information. Distribution of the information does not constitute such a warranty. Use of the information is the sole responsibility of the user. Links provided on this website are being provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only; they do not constitute an endorsement or an approval by TGR of any of the products, services or opinions of the corporation or organization or individual. TGR bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality, or content of the external site or for that of subsequent links contained in the external site. Contact the external site for any answers to questions regarding the links content. Geological and hydrogeological data and graphics included in this website are provided in draft form only, except for those documents which have the seal of a Registered Professional Geoscientist or Registered Professional Engineer affixed.

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©2019 by the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District.